Thursday, November 6, 2014

Exploration 6, Jenn Peddicord


       In the film Fresh by Ana Sofia Jones, it is continually talks about better, healthier and more natural ways to grow, maintain and sell produce and livestock with out the use of antibiotics. I found this film to be extremely informative as well as convicting in regards to my eating and buying habits as fair as poultry and vegatables. One topic discussed in the film was the idea of buying and selling locally. Buying and selling locally not only helps prepare communities from outbreaks and epidemics in our food, but supports our local farmers, who give us truth and insight to their ways of farming, unlike many of the franchises we buy from weekly.
Author, Michael Pollan said, "Americans fear one thing: inconvenience." He goes on to say that we as humans want more and more food, not faced but the shortcuts that may be taken in order to make that happen. Many of the top food production franchises give the minimal amount of information required legally, as far what goes into and what the process of making this food looks like. Stuart B.Levy, a doctor who has researched this topic frequently over the years, says his estimation for the amount of antibiotics used each year is anywhere from 15-17 million pounds. See link for more information, http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/meat/safe/overview.html . Another question brought up against organic and local farming
       It is often said that buying organically or from local farmers cost more. While that statement can be true, you are not being charged for the chemicals and production costs to produce your food, you are being charged for the quality. "Cheap food is an illusion," said Founder and Executive Director of the Center for food safety, Andrew Kimbrell. We live in a world where we are easily angered by having to go the extra mile.What people don't realize is that we live in a world that thrives on supply and demand. If more people start to pay attention to what and where the food we are eating comes from and goes through, until it is placed in our shopping carts, then the demand for naturally grow and locally owned food will go up. If we as a community start to join the Buy Organic, Buy Local "movement", and make it start to be the "norm" we will no longer be shell-shocked by prices. We know what we are paying for and its quality, not quantity.

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